Abbreviations: Plurals

Common abbreviations use the same form for singular and plural.
in.—inch, inches
ft.—foot, feet
oz.—ounce, ounces
rpm—rotations per minute, not rpms

A few abbreviations, usually those preceding a number, require an s to form plurals.
lbs. <BH&G uses lb. for plural also>
pgs.
figs.
yds.
Nos.
CDs


 

Abbreviations
Capitalization
Company Names
Dates and Times
Degrees and Certifications
Periods
Plurals
Spaces

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Credits: Illustrators

Steve Bjorkman
Tom Casmer
Julian Clark
Kara Fellows
Eric Flynn
Liz Gordon (added 9/14/20)
Donna Grethen
Michael A. Hill (added 2/11/21)
Donna Ingemanson
Chris Neubauer
Carson Ode
Gary Palmer
Travis Rice
Tom Rosborough
Helen Smythe
Ann Weiss


 

Copy editors
Field editors
Food stylists
Guidelines
Illustrators
Names
Order
Photographers
Producers/Stylists
Style

Writers

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Trademarks: Common

In general, avoid using brand names. Instead, choose a more detailed but generic description. (Product stories are an obvious exception.)
incorrect: The IKEA sofa creates a lively focal point.
correct: A bright, contemporary sofa creates a lively focal point.

Be aware that some names that have made their way into the vernacular are actually trademarked brand names that usually should be avoided. Con-Tact paper, Crock-Pot, Jacuzzi, Lycra, Plexiglas, Sheetrock, Spackle, Styrofoam, Thermos, and Velcro are just a few. If you do use a trademarked name, be sure you’re using it correctly. It’s just as bad to call a generic product “Plexiglas” as it is to call the name brand “plexiglass.” Also, use trademark symbols (™ and ®) only with Meredith products.

Following is a list of common trademarks with the appropriate generic terminology. For a more complete list, search the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office database.

Anaglypta embossed decorative wall covering
Baggies plastic bags
Band-Aid adhesive bandages
Bel Paese cheese
Bundt pan fluted cake/tube pan
Carborundum abrasive
Chalk Paint paint with a matte, almost chalky, finish
Con-Tact self-sticking covering
Corian solid-surfacing
CorningWare (12/2/20) cookware, ovenware
Cran- cranberry
Crescent wrench adjustable-end wrench
Crock-Pot slow cooker
Cuisinart food processor
Cyclone fence chain-link fence
Dacron polyester fiber/fiberfill
Day-Glo fluorescent
Derby-Pie chocolate-nut pie
Dry Ice refrigerant
Feather Rock lightweight or porous rock
Fiberglas fiberglass/glass fibers
Fiestaware use for Fiesta products made by Homer Laughlin China Co.
Filo phyllo/pastry dough
Flex-arm lamp swing-arm lamp
Formica plastic laminate
Gunite pneumatically applied concrete
Herculon olefin fiber
Hershey’s Kisses Kisses milk chocolates (see Word List)
Hide-A-Bed sofa bed
Hot Tray electric warming tray
Instant Pot multifunction electric pressure cooker
Jacuzzi whirlpool bath
Jell-O gelatin
Jenn-Air self-venting range
Kiddie Kar toy car
Kitty Litter cat box filler
Kool-Aid soft-drink mix
Laundromat coin laundry/self-service laundry
Legos plastic construction toys
Lincrusta decorative wall coverings
Liquid Nails building materials adhesive
Louver drapery vertical blinds
Lucite acrylic resin/acrylic plastic
Lycra spandex fiber
Mace liquid tear gas
Masa Harina tortilla flour
Masonite hardboard/fiberboard
Molly bolt expansion bolt/hollow wall anchor
Mylar clear polyester film
Naval Jelly petroleum jelly
Oasis floral foam (updated 2/6/17)
Peg-Board perforated board/pegboard
Pellon fusible webbing
Ping-Pong table tennis
Plastic Wood wood filler
Play-Doh modeling clay
Plexiglas acrylic plastic/plexiglass
Poly-Fil synthetic fiber
Polyweb fusible webbing
Popsicle frozen dessert/pop stick
Procion fabric dye
Pyrex heat-resistant glassware
Q-Tips cotton swabs
Realtor real estate agent (unless member)
Roquefort blue cheese
Saran Wrap plastic film
Scotchgard protective spray coating
Sheetrock drywall/wallboard/plasterboard
Shabby Chic timeworn elegance/timeworn chic
Simoniz polish/wax
Sonontubes concrete form tubes
Spackle surfacing compound
Spode sponge ware
Stetson high-brimmed hat
Stitch Witchery fusible webbing
Styrofoam foam
Tabasco sauce hot pepper sauce
Teflon fluorocarbon resins/nonstick coating
Thermopane insulated glass
Thermos thermal container
Tinkertoy construction toy
Ultrasuede imitation suede
Vaseline petroleum jelly
Velcro touch fastener/hook-and-loop tape
Vise-Grip locking plier-wrench
Waferwood waferboard
Walkman portable radio/stereo and headphones
Weed Eater grass and weed trimmer
Weight Watchers diet foods
Woodtape decorative wood strips
X-acto crafts knife
Xerox photocopy
Yellow Pages no longer a trademark, but often capitalized
Ziploc resealable plastic storage bags, ziplock plastic bags

 

Trademarks
Common trademarks
Meredith trademarks

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Inclusive Writing

Previously Nonsexist Writing
updated 11/19/20

According to the Guidelines for Inclusive Language, published by the Linguistic Society of America, “inclusive language acknowledges diversity, conveys respect to all people, is sensitive to differences, and promotes equal opportunities.” We could not have said it better. We urge all writers and editors of Meredith content to choose words that do not exclude readers, to assume that readership is varied and broad, and to be aware that what once was considered a common expression now could be offensive.

The careful, thinking content creator knows that inclusive writing does not mean catering to a target audience at the expense of others. Instead, it means evaluating your words to make sure they don’t unnecessarily assume all your readers are white/female/married/Christian/have 2.5 children. Even if 80 percent of readers fall into one category, the remaining 20 percent represent tens of thousands of readers—customers—who don’t.

Some areas where we inadvertently may make assumptions about readers, such as religion, marital status, race, sex, age, disability, and sexual orientation, are obvious. Other assumptions, such as geographic location and nationality, may be more easily overlooked.

For example:
• The trend is sweeping the States. (Excludes Canadian readers.)
• Your kids will thank you. (Excludes readers without children but who have nieces and nephews.)
• Call a builder and let him handle the job. (Sexism.)
• A petite brunette, Marilyn has a reputation as an eagle-eye bargain finder. (Appearance doesn’t matter to skill set.)
• If you’re planning on having your tribe over for Thanksgiving, you need these recipes. (Cultural appropriation.)
• You could call this upholsterer a material girl. (Calling an adult a boy/girl is demeaning, even if it is meant as a play on Madonna. And this example was in regard to a Black woman so was even more disparaging.)
• Lenny Kravitz’s dreadlocks are a political statement. (Dreadlocks has negative connotations; locs/locks is the preferred term.)

Avoid writing that fosters gender discrimination, promotes demeaning stereotypes, or suggests a superiority of or preference for one gender over another. Evaluate your copy with a careful eye. Do you need to rewrite to eliminate or find substitutes for gendered words or to avoid condescending descriptions?

For example:
Wrong: Call your builder and let him handle the job.
Right: Let your builder handle the job.

Wrong: If the rash persists, ask your doctor for his advice.
Right: If the rash persists, consult your doctor.

Wrong: Whether you are celebrating your husband’s promotion …
Right: Whether you are celebrating your spouse’s promotion …

Acceptable: Every dog-lover has his or her favorite breed.
Better: Every dog-lover has a favorite breed.

Wrong: A petite brunette of 30 who could still pass for a coed, Marilyn has a reputation as the best trial lawyer in the state. (Looks and physical stature are not relevant to this accomplishment.)
Right: At the age of 30, Marilyn has a reputation as the best trial lawyer in the state. (Age is relevant.)
Or this: Marilyn has a reputation as the best trial lawyer in the state. (If she is 45, her age is insignificant in relation to her accomplishment.)

Possible nongendered substitutions for gendered words.
businessman/woman (executive, manager, entrepreneur)
cameraman (camera operator, technician, photographer)
chairman/woman (presiding officer, leader, moderator)
craftsmanship (artisanship, artistry, handiwork, expertise, skill)
delivery boy (courier, messenger)
firemen/women (firefighters)
foreman (supervisor, manager)
founding fathers (pioneers, colonists, patriots, forebears, founding fathers in certain contexts)
manhole (maintenance hole)
mankind (people, humanity, human beings, human race)
man-made (synthetic, artificial, constructed, manufactured)
manpower (human resources, workers, work force)
man-size (husky, sizable, large, requiring exceptional ability)
repairman/handyman (maintenance person, plumber, carpenter, electrician)
salesman (salesperson, sales clerk, sales representative)
workman (laborer, employee, staff member)

Resources for diversity and inclusivity in writing can be found in References. Many go deeper into the subject than Meredith brands might need; however, they can open our eyes to unconscious biases and guide us toward more inclusive language.

 


 

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Credits: Names

In text, refer to homeowners by their first names after first reference. For architects, designers, and other professionals, after first reference use last name only—unless they are also the homeowners!

BH&G: Homeowner and subject, use first names on second reference. Professionals use last name on second reference.  (Changed 7/5/2017)

The first mention in text, captions, and sidebars should identify homeowners and professionals with their first and last names.

In general, don’t use last names for minors; last names may be implied, however, if children are part of a family featured in a story. If using a minor’s last name is important to a story (a 14-year-old recipe-contest winner, for example), verify that the minor’s guardians have signed the proper release form(s).

See also the Quotes and Quotation Marks section of the BHGStylebook.


 

Copy editors
Field editors
Food stylists
Guidelines
Illustrators
Names
Order
Photographers
Producers/Stylists
Style

Writers

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Credits: SIM Guidelines

Sometimes a field editor’s contribution to a story extends beyond the routine functions we have come to expect. In those cases, a special byline may be appropriate. At the editor’s discretion, one of the following bylines may be used.

Option 1
The standard “field editor” credit is used when:
The field editor found the location and made arrangements for a photo shoot.
The field editor performs normal prop shopping/photo styling functions.
The field editor provides the editor with routing manuscript notes and a source list.
(A person can be credited as a field editor if he/she has completed all the above functions; he/she may or may not be listed on the masthead.)
Field editor: Mindy Pantiel

Option 2
A “produced by” credit may be used when:
The field editor contributed significantly to the development of the story concept and its execution without an editorial or art presence.
The field editor was actively involved in the identification and acquisition of products or materials used in a shoot (excluding prop shopping).
Produced by Mindy Pantiel

Option 3
A “by” credit may be used when:
In addition to performing the usual functions, the field editor writes a finished manuscript that the editor judges to be of publishable quality (except for routine editing needs).
By Mindy Pantiel

Option 4
A “written and produced by” credit may be used when:
All of the elements in Option 2 and Option 3 are met.
Written and produced by Mindy Pantiel

Sometimes a field editor’s contribution to a story is less than the routine functions we have come to expect. In those cases, at the editor’s discretion, the byline “contributing field editor” may be used.

Any non-field editor who does at least one of the duties normally completed by a field editor may be listed as “contributing field editor.”

 


 

Copy editors
Field editors
Food stylists
Guidelines
Illustrators
Names
Order
Photographers
Producers/Stylists
Style

Writers

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Credits: Order

Generally, we will credit in the following order:
Writer:
Photographer:
Illustrator:
Designer: (and other professionals involved in the story: food stylist, prop stylist)
Architect:
Builder:
Contractor:
Location:
Field editor:

Some variations may exist, depending on the magazine and specific intentions and uses.

Directionals in credits are italicized.

For line-by-line credits:
There is no period at the end of each line or credit (unless needed after an abbreviation).
Photographer: Jon Miller, Hedrich-Blessing
Designer: Catherine Chiesa/Design Pour Vous
Mural artist: Kathleen L. McCann, Savoir Faire Designs, Inc.
Field editors: Sally Mauer and Hilary Rose

For multiple photographers:
Photographers: directional, Name; directional, Name.

The credit style should be consistent throughout an issue.


 

Copy editors
Field editors
Food stylists
Guidelines
Illustrators
Names
Order
Photographers
Producers/Stylists
Style

Writers

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Credits: SIM Style

Photographers should be credited using one of the two following styles. Treatment should be consistent throughout an issue.
Photographer: Greg Scheidemann
Photography by Greg Scheidemann

In general, studio names are not listed.

Multiple photographers should be credited using the following style.
Photographers: left, Greg Scheidemann; below, Andy Lyons.

 


 

Copy editors
Field editors
Food stylists
Guidelines
Illustrators
Names
Order
Photographers
Producers/Stylists
Style
Writers

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Credits: Copy Editors

(Staff CEs are in bold)

EJA: Liz Anderson
JMC: Julie Collins Bates
ERB: Erika Bjorklund
SXB: Steven Blaski
EAB: Elizabeth (Beth) Brinsfield
ASC: Andrea Cooley
NJD: Nancy Dietz
MD: Maria Duryee
AMG: Alyse Garcia
MLH: Mary Heaton
AI: Angie Ingle
AJK: Amy Kuebelbeck
MSL: Martha Long
SMM: Sheila Mauck
NJM: Nancy McClimen
JSR: Jennifer Speer Ramundt
AKR: Angela Renkoski

MHS: Mary Helen Schiltz
CAT: Carrie Truesdell (formerly Schmitz)


 

Copy editors
Field editors
Food stylists
Guidelines
Illustrators
Names
Order
Photographers
Producers/Stylists
Style

Writers

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