Styles

Words such as “era,” “movement,” and “period” should be capitalized when they constitute an integral part of a proper noun or adjective.
Examples:
Victorian Era mores
Arts and Crafts Movement
Early American Period

Arts and Crafts
Art Deco
Art Moderne
Art Nouveau
Baroque
Bauhaus
Beaux Arts
Biedermeier
British Colonial
Byzantine
Cape Cod
Carpenter Gothic
Chateauesque
Chinese
Chippendale
classic
coastal cottage
Colonial
Colonial Revival
contemporary
country
country French (not French country)
cottage
Craftsman
Creole cottage
Cubist
Directoire
Dutch Colonial
Early American
eclectic
Edwardian
Elizabethan
Empire
English cottage
English Tudor
Federal
folk art
foursquare
French Colonial
French country (use country French instead)
French Provincial
functionalist
Georgian
Gothic
Gothic Revival
Greek Revival
Hellenic
Hepplewhite
high-tech
Hill Country (Texas)
Hollywood Regency
Impressionist
International
Italianate
Jacobean
Low Country (decorating style from coastal South Carolina, not an architectural style)
Mediterranean
midcentury modern
Mission
modern
Moderne
modular
Moorish
neobaroque
neoclassic
neoeclectic
neo-Gothic
neotraditional
Oriental (sometimes considered offensive; use Asian when appropriate)
Palladian
Pennsylvania Dutch
postmodern
Prairie
Prairie School
Pueblo
Queen Anne
Queen Anne Victorian
ranch
RĂ©gence
Regency
Renaissance
Restoration
rococo
Romanesque
saltbox
Scandinavian
Second Empire
sectional
Shaker
Sheraton
Shingle style
shotgun
Single House
Spanish Colonial
Spanish eclectic
Spanish Territorial
Steamboat Gothic
Stick
Territorial
Tudor
Victorian
William and Mary

See also
Hyphens, especially the rule about well-established compounds.


 

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