Hyphens: Prefixes

Common prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms (see lists below) generally are joined to words without a hyphen. Use a hyphen when adding a prefix, suffix, or combined form creates an ambiguous word (as in the case of homonyms) or a word that would make the reader hesitate.
You can re-cover the chair.
Can you recover the money?
He re-sided the house.
He resided in Des Moines.

Common prefixes joined to words without a hyphen:
anti-
de-
dis-
in-
infra-
inter-
intra-
mid- (except months)
mis-
multi-*
non-
over-
per-
post-
pre-
pro-
re-
semi-
sub-
super- (unless it means very)
supra-
trans-
ultra-
un-
under-
*except multi-ply (which could be confused with multiply)

Use a hyphen with the prefix ex-.
ex-president

Use a hyphen when the main word element is capitalized or is a figure or a word combination.
un-American
pre-Queen Anne
pre-1980

EXCEPTIONS:
transatlantic
prerevolutionary


 

Hyphens
Combining forms
Line-break rules
Prefixes
Suffixes

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